notes from the island: twirl

Driving home from work on Tuesday, she decided to pick up the tea the doctor had recommended. It was dark out, well past six on a January night. The doctor’s hippie tea blends were sold from big jars at the coffee shop. She parked in front of the coffee shop and got out of her car distracted by the light-filled building across the street. A concert or something at the Arts Center.

It looked fun, full of people on an otherwise sleepy weeknight. Too late to join in, probably. Preoccupied by this, she walked into the coffee shop and found it dark and empty.

She looked around.

There was no one inside.

Even considering what a quirky, hippie business it was, this seemed a bit much…

And then the alarm went off.

Tiptoeing out of the building, she was met with a guy leaning against his car outside, saying, “They’re closed.”

He said it in in that mellow Northwestwerly way that is chill and friendly, but uncaring.

“I figured that out,” she said. “Hopefully they will, too.”

The doctor had agreed that she was BURNT OUT. She had been prescribed the tea to restore the burn, and was also supposed to go in on Saturday for blood work to confirm.

She had sat down with this doctor, an island doctor, who must be kinder and more patient than most, because she lived here, for more than an hour. They had discussed everything from what kinds of foods she craved to what caused her stress as a child.

Trust in a doctor-patient relationship is not just about discretion. It’s about an investment of time, and of confessing one’s sins.

I drink too much.

Okay, yes, I do smoke.

Sometimes I eat a whole box of donuts.

You tell your doctor, not for forgiveness, but because your imperfections are presumably a factor. In a perfect world, a doctor would see the whole you, so they could diagnose the entire ecosystem of you, mindful of the donuts, but not judging them.

In a perfect world.

She had had a wonderful first date with this doctor. They had covered so much ground. She felt the afterglow of confession, of feeling recognized in the eyes of an extremely educated medical professional. She felt that, surely, this woman would understand her situation and help her fix it.

So she had pills to take and tea to drink and blood work in a few days.

A designer and artist, she felt her ailments in color and texture. Thursday, in the overcast heart of January, she felt as she had for months a craving for red. This red was the color of passion, and not just any red – cabernet. Call it pretentious, but by god, only the deepest, richest red would do.

In her quest for this rich, vivacious, un-burned-out, reddest of reds, she was lured by the corner of a dress folded on a 50% off table. She hadn’t been into this shop, up the street from the doctor’s office, before. It looked so twee from the street. But here she was rummaging through their sale goods.

Carrying two dresses into the shop, one (let us go ahead and call it) cabernet and the other turquoise, she was greeted by a fluffy woman in overalls, arms outspread, offering her dressing room – Behind the curtain, just shove the wrapping paper out of the way.

When she emerged a short time later, she was met with, “You didn’t come out for a twirl!”

She bought both of them and promised to come in next time she was wearing one, to twirl.

On Saturday morning she walked into the doctor’s office to be greeted by the typically calm assistant bursting with explanations and lectures. I was just calling you… so you know… you would be the one to call the lab to check if the blood work was covered… 

The doctor emerged. It was that moment, after a date, when you run into someone on the street and they’re suddenly frosty. I said you would need to call them, the doctor said.

She left feeling like an idiot. The labyrinth that is American healthcare had defeated her, once again. She hadn’t read the invisible ink.

Silly girl.

There was surely moral enough in the fact that she, personally, diagnosed and treated herself with a dress of a certain color. But that was the thing about this life, an assumption she made, perhaps foolishly – that everyone had a role and could work together. She assumed she could be the one who thought in colors, and that a doctor could be the one who thought in treatments, and so on. She believed in specialization. But it was becoming clear to her that she would need to start educating her specialists. Write it down in more detail, please. Who am I calling, and what do I say?

In the meantime what made her feel better was not the tea she hadn’t been able to buy, or the possibility of this lab work, or even the red of the dress she’d bought.

What made her feel better was remembering that shopkeeper, arms open wide, insisting, You owe me a twirl!

One thought on “notes from the island: twirl

  1. Hey i like your stories. Im an old friend of Lyman B.’s He texted your link to me just days before his stroke.I thank you for them now as I read more and more in the wake of learning about his stroke. I live in N.C. but love Vashon and have visited many times. Lyman picked me up hitchiking in ca. In 1984 and weve been well, phone buddys ever since .Ivo

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